The Future Is

Together, let's build California's next-gen infrastructure.

We’ll Build It Later

For years, that’s been the answer of local officials, state representatives, and federal policy makers when asked about our infrastructure. They’ve continuously put off necessary updates and crucial rebuilding, opting instead for short-term ‘band-aid’ solutions.

Solutions like building more housing units — in neighborhoods that don’t have the infrastructure to support them. Solutions like repairing water mains after they break — rather than modernizing the whole outdated system.

We can’t keep waiting for ‘later’ to come.

Not when so many of our roads are categorized as ‘at risk.’ Not when so many of our bridges don’t have the capacity to withstand the unexpected loads of climate change. And not when so many of our own electrical equipment systems are responsible for devastating events like wildfires.

California’s infrastructure — our way of life — is threatening to collapse because its foundation isn’t strong enough to hold it. And it’s not threatening to collapse later. It’s threatening to collapse now.

Your Cities, Your Infrastructure

Infrastructure is not a partisan problem. This is something that affects each and every one of us, each and every day. It’s the roads we drive on, the busses we take, and the traffic zones we avoid. It’s the schools we send our kids to, the systems that give us clean water, and the structures that stop storms from flooding our homes.

In a post-Covid world, there is no more “business as usual”.  Most smaller municipal governments in California rely heavily on sales tax revenue.  Something which has been plateauing even before Covid, and is now at a crisis point

Now, more than ever, there is an urgent need to re-evaluate how we plan our cities and implement approaches that can retain brick-and-mortar small business as well as incubate new high growth industries.

Don't Ignore The Problem

Over the next 20 years, California’s expected to see another 10 million people added to its population. But we’re already dealing with a foundation that can’t support its population today.

According to the American Society of Civil Engineers’ 2019 Infrastructure Report Card, California averaged a C- over 17 categories. Six of those categories, including energy, roads, and inland waterways, were deemed “Poor” or “Extremely Poor.” They were given a letter grade of D.

If we continue to ignore the problem — if we continue to accept short-term ‘band-aid’ fixes from the people in charge — then we’re not just setting ourselves up for danger when those 10 million new people arrive. We’re setting ourselves up for danger now.

Our Economic Recovery Challenge

With the effects of COVID-19 demanding attention — and unprecedented spending — from state and federal governments, the local governments are even more strapped for cash than before. Many are looking to apply quick fixes that restore the old normal — even though that normal wasn’t beneficial to most of us.

Foundational to the changes brought on by internet commerce and COVID-19 are modern infrastructure and zoning approaches to support a more resilient economy.  One where high growth businesses are nurtured and can provide consistent daytime traffic for vibrant brick-and-mortar ecosystems within downtown corridors.

Our Economic Recovery Challenge

With the effects of COVID-19 demanding attention — and unprecedented spending — from state and federal governments, the local governments are even more strapped for cash than before. Many are looking to apply quick fixes that restore the old normal — even though that normal wasn’t beneficial to most of us.

Foundational to the changes brought on by internet commerce and COVID-19 are modern infrastructure and zoning approaches to support a more resilient economy.  One where high growth businesses are nurtured and can provide consistent daytime traffic for vibrant brick-and-mortar ecosystems within downtown corridors.

That's where the Urban Development Fund comes in

We’re an infrastructure-first coalition that gets the ball rolling on all things related to our cities’ rebuilding.

We write the policy recommendation papers that get officials moving. We produce the ads and educational content that get the right candidates elected. We support critical projects through the planning approval process – from community engagement to local government acceptance.  And we help facilitate the public-private financing efforts that make all of the crucial infrastructure changes possible.

Donate For Change

Urban Development Fund is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.  Your generous donations help support policy research, urban planning programming with community stakeholders, and direct collaboration with municipal governments

Address:
1020 B St, San Rafael, CA
94901

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